Tomah Health Foundation Supports Free Foot Care Clinic

Beverly Kamrath knows how important is it to have healthy feet. The Tomah resident was one of 60 people who attended a free foot care clinic at Tomah Health Dec.6.

“It’s wonderful and it relates to everything else with your health. It’s a very good clinic,” added Kamrath who was attending for the first time.

Beverly Kamrath of Tomah was one of 60 people that that took part in the free foot care clinic at Tomah Health Dec. 6

The clinic was made possible thanks to a $2,500 donation by the Tomah Health Community Foundation. “It’s through the generous contributions of donations by area residents to the foundation that allows us to make contributions like this that promote wellness and health within our community,” said foundation president Pete Reichardt. He said the foundation’s donation fulfills the mission of the organization to support health related initiatives that benefit area residents.

Last spring the Foundation also contributed $2,500 to fund the clinics conducted by Viterbo graduate nurses who trim, cut, clip nails, corns, and calluses using state-of-the-art equipment.

“We are thrilled to be the recipient of this generosity from the Tomah Health Foundation,” said Mary Ellen Stolder, Viterbo University graduate nursing program director.

According to Stolder, Monroe County is home to more than 7,000 adults over the age of 65, and foot problems affect 75 percent of those adults.

“Providing foot care promotes an individuals’ independence,” Stolder said. “It also promotes their mobility and maintains their dignity, so it is a very effective intervention especially for the older adult population who cannot afford foot care.”

Stolder said foot care is not typically provided with Medicare funding and if a person has to make tradeoffs, foot care is one consideration that they will eliminate.

Besides the care for residents, Stolder said the clinics provide a great learning opportunity for student nurses. “It gives them a lot of experience in terms of a brief health history, conducting an assessment, how to handle the tools, and to be able to ascertain if there is a need for a referral, which is critical,” she said.

More than 200 people have attended the foot care clinics in Tomah. Officials are planning future foot care clinics March 27, June 5 and Aug. 7 at Tomah Health.Bev Kamrath knows how important is it to have healthy feet. The Tomah resident was one of 60 people who attended a free foot care clinic at Tomah Health Dec.6.

“It’s wonderful and it relates to everything else with your health. It’s a very good clinic,” added Kamrath who was attending for the first time.

The Tomah Health Community Foundation donated $2,500 to Viterbo University Dec. 6 to support free foot care clinics held at Tomah Health. Foundation members included (left – right) Erin Dawley, Peter Reichardt, Brian Eirschele, Derek Burnstad, Jenny McCoy, Viterbo University assistant professor LuAnn Folwer, DNP, Foundation member Jeremy Haldeman and Viterbo University graduate nursing program director Mary Ellen Stolder, PhD, RN, ANP-BC.

The clinic was made possible thanks to a $2,500 donation by the Tomah Health Community Foundation. “It’s through the generous contributions of donations by area residents to the foundation that allows us to make contributions like this that promote wellness and health within our community,” said foundation president Pete Reichardt. He said the foundation’s donation fulfills the mission of the organization to support health related initiatives that benefit area residents.

Last spring the Foundation also contributed $2,500 to fund the clinics conducted by Viterbo graduate nurses who trim, cut, clip nails, corns, and calluses using state-of-the-art equipment.

“We are thrilled to be the recipient of this generosity from the Tomah Health Foundation,” said Mary Ellen Stolder, Viterbo University graduate nursing program director.

According to Stolder, Monroe County is home to more than 7,000 adults over the age of 65, and foot problems affect 75 percent of those adults.

“Providing foot care promotes an individuals’ independence,” Stolder said. “It also promotes their mobility and maintains their dignity, so it is a very effective intervention especially for the older adult population who cannot afford foot care.”

Stolder said foot care is not typically provided with Medicare funding and if a person has to make tradeoffs, foot care is one consideration that they will eliminate.

Besides the care for residents, Stolder said the clinics provide a great learning opportunity for student nurses. “It gives them a lot of experience in terms of a brief health history, conducting an assessment, how to handle the tools, and to be able to ascertain if there is a need for a referral, which is critical,” she said.

More than 200 people have attended the foot care clinics in Tomah. Officials are planning future foot care clinics March 27, June 5 and Aug. 7 at Tomah Health.

Tomah Health